Apistogramma Agassizii Care (Agassiz’s Dwarf Cichlid)


Apistogramma Agassizii, also known as Agassiz’s Dwarf Cichlid, is a dwarf cichlid that originates from the Apure River in Venezuela. As an Apistogramma species, they are often referred to as Apistos for short as well. It is a small but colorful fish that can make a great addition to any aquarium. They are an easy fish to care for and they can be placed in many different types of aquariums.

Meaning of Name “Apistogramma Agassizii”

Apistogramma is a translation from ancient Greek meaning “unreliable line“. Many of these fish have a black line that runs across the body and fades or deepens with age.

Apistogramma Agassizii Care

Apistogramma Agassizii are great for beginners looking into keeping freshwater fish as pets. This article will describe how to properly care for these fish so that it can live a long and healthy life.

Apistogramma Agassizii Temperature

The temperature of your Apistogramma Agassizii’s aquarium is important to keep them healthy and happy. Apistos prefer a temperature range of 73-79 degrees Fahrenheit (23-26 degrees Celsius). If the water temperature in your aquarium falls outside this range for an extended period of time, your Apistos may become stressed and ill. You can use a thermometer to monitor the water temperature in your aquarium and adjust your home’s heating or cooling as necessary to keep it within the preferred range.

Apistogramma Agassizii
Apistogramma Agassizii

Apistogramma Agassizii Water pH

The pH level of your Apistogramma Agassizii’s home aquarium is another important factor to consider when keeping these fish. Apistos prefer a pH of 6.5-7. You can use a pH test kit to measure the pH level of your aquarium.

Apistogramma Agassizii Size

The Apistogramma Agassizii is a small fish that typically grows to be around 2.5 inches in length. This size makes the Apisto an excellent choice for smaller aquariums, and they can also be kept in larger tanks if you have enough room.

Apistogramma Agassizii Tank Size

In most cases, the Apistogramma Agassizii can be kept in both small and large aquariums. If you have a smaller tank, these fish will do well in a community setting with other peaceful fish species. Larger tanks can also house Apistos, but you should provide plenty of hiding places for them to feel secure. Rocks or plants can be used to create hiding spots for your Apistos, and you should also make sure to include a good filtration system to keep the water clean.

Apistogramma Agassizii Food & Diet

Apistogramma Agassizii are omnivorous and will eat a variety of foods. They will primarily feed on algae growing on rocks or plants, but they will also eat small invertebrates and other fish. This means that you don’t need to provide them with food like some other fish species do. However, it is still a good idea to supplement their diet with live or frozen food. Some good food options include bloodworms, brine shrimp, daphnia, and mosquito larvae.

Apistogramma Agassizii Lifespan

The Apistogramma lifespan is typically between five and ten years, though this can vary depending on the species. You can help them reach the upper end of that range by maintaining water conditions and providing them with a relatively stress-free life.

Apistogramma Agassizii Tank Setup

When setting up an aquarium for Apistogramma Agassizii, make sure to provide plenty of hiding places for the fish. This can be done by using rocks, driftwood, or artificial plants. It is also important to use a substrate that the fish can dig in, such as sand or gravel. Apistos prefer to live in pairs or in a group with one male and several females, so it is best to keep a colony of these fish in a tank of 15 to 20 gallons.

Apistogramma Agassizii Breeding

Apistogramma Agassizii can be bred in a number of different ways. One popular way to breed them is by using flower pots that have been turned upside down. Another option is to use fake “coconut caves” or bogwood. Apistos also like to spawn on broad-leafed plants. To get them to breed, you will need to provide a pH of 6.0 to 6.5, a water hardness of 5 – 8 dH, and a temperature of 79° to 84° F (26° – 29° C). You will also need to change the water frequently.

Apistogramma Agassizii Disease

Apistogramma Agassizii are not immune to disease and can fall victim to a number of different illnesses. The most common Apisto disease is ichthyophthirius, also known as ick or ich. Ich is a parasitic infection that causes white spots to form on the fish’s body. The spots grow in size and number until the fish dies. If your Apisto contracts ich, you will need to treat it with a medication like ick-x or copper sulfate as soon as possible.

Another common Apisto disease is fin rot. Fin rot is a bacterial infection that causes the fins to become red and swollen. The bacteria also cause the fish to lose its appetite and eventually die. If your Apisto contracts fin rot, you will need to treat it with a medication like ick-x or copper sulfate as soon as possible.

Apistogramma Agassizii Tank Mates

Apistogramma Agassizii can be kept with a variety of other fish species. Some good tank mates for Apistos include smaller tetras, barbs, and danios. Apistos do well in community tanks and will help to keep the other fish in check. They can also be kept with some of the more peaceful cichlids, such as angelfish and discus. It is important to avoid keeping Apistos with aggressive fish though, as they may become stressed or injured.

Are Apistogramma Agassizii community fish?

Apistogramma Agassizii are a great choice for a community tank because they are small, colorful, and don’t take up too much space as they live on the bottom of the tank.

Do Apistogramma Agassizii need to be in pairs?

Apistogramma Agassizii are a very social fish and can become stressed if they are not kept in a group or with one male and several females. While Apistos do fine alone, it is important to make sure that the tank has plenty of hiding places for them to feel comfortable.

Examples of Compatible Tank Mates

Some good tank mates for Apistos include smaller tetras, barbs, and danios. Apistos do well in community tanks and will help to keep the other fish in check. They can also be kept with some of the more peaceful cichlids, such as angelfish and discus. It is important to avoid keeping Apistos with aggressive fish though, as they may become stressed or injured.

Examples of Compatible Tank Mates

Some bad tank mates for Apistos include larger fish, such as Oscars or other cichlids, as they may attack and injure the Apistos. Another bad choice for a tank mate is the common goldfish, which can outgrow Apistos very quickly. It is also important to avoid keeping Apistos with fish that like to nip at the fins, such as most tetras and barbs.

Where can I find Apistogramma Agassizii for sale?

Apistogramma Agassizii can be found for sale at most pet stores that specialize in fish. They can also be found online at a number of different websites. Prices vary but typically cost between $5 and $10 each. Hybrid Apistos with hybrid coloration or new variants can cost upwards of $25 each.

Apistogramma Agassizii Types

The types and colors of Apistogramma Agassizii depend on the location and breeding of the species. Their indigenous origins are the Apure River in Venezuela, but they are often tank-bred. It can be challenging to label an Apistos since there are many color hybrids and variants. Below is a general guide to identifying the different types of Apistogramma Agassizii.

  • Apistogramma Agassizii Double Red: Multicolored – yellow and orange.
  • Apistogramma Agassizii Cuipeua: Both males and females have yellow to orange colors.
  • Apistogramma Agassizii Super Red: Males and females have a silver body with a vibrant red tail.
  • Apistogramma Agassizii Flame Red: Both males and females have yellow, red, and orange colors with a purple back.
  • Apistogramma Agassizii Orange: Both males and females have an orange color with a black line on their bodies.
  • Apistogramma Agassizii Fire Gold: Both males and females have a vibrant yellow color.
  • Apistogramma Agassizii Tefe Blue: Adult males are blue while females have yellow coloration.
  • Apistogramma Agassizii Redback (Tefe Redback): Vibrant blue with orange-red fins.

Conclusion

So there you have it, an Apistogramma Agassizii care guide designed for aquarium enthusiasts who want to help keep those Apists forever happy and healthy. In summary, Apistos are a wonderful fish to keep even if it is your first time keeping freshwater fish as pets – they are easy to care for due to their algae diet. The Apisto will be very happy in most community aquariums but make sure to avoid keeping them with aggressive fish or fish that like to nip at the fins.

I hope you enjoyed this Apistogramma Agassizii (Agassiz’s dwarf cichlid) care guide designed for anyone who wants to keep Apistos in their aquariums forever happy and healthy. I hope this Apisto care information helped provide an Apistos aquarium that will allow you to enjoy your Apistos as much as we do!

Fish Laboratory

With decades of collective fishkeeping experience, we are happy to share the fish care tips that we've picked up along the way. Our goal at Fish Laboratory is to keep publishing accurate content to help fishkeepers keep their fish and aquarium healthy.

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