Pothos in Aquariums: Are Pothos Plants Good for Aquariums?

Pothos Plants are a popular plant that many people use in their homes for its toxic air purifying properties. It has also become a common plant that is used in aquarium setups. They are very beneficial, and they are easy to propagate. The Pothos Plant can provide your aquarium with oxygenation. If you plant your Pothos into your aquarium substrate, it will aerate the water as it uses up the carbon dioxide the fish expel and then it releases the oxygen back into the water. They provide more oxygen and absorb more nitrates than other plants.

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Salt and Pepper Corydoras: Care, Size, Lifespan & Breeding

Color pattern is somewhat varied among the Salt and Pepper Corydora fish. The fish can be identified by its light tan body covered with black and shiny silver spotting and broken striping. This is a much smaller species than the similarly named Peppered Cory Catfish, and when doing research about the Salt and Pepper Corydora the information could be easily confused between the two species.

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Samurai Gourami Care: Diet, Tank Size, Breeding & Disease

Samurai Gourami male can be distinguished from the female, but it can be somewhat difficult. The female Samurai Gourami is more colorful than the male, and you can identify her more easily by looking at her markings. The females have a vibrant iridescent green to their bodies, and they have red and green vertical bars on their sides. They also have a straighter lower jaw, and have a more prominent head shape than the males. The females also have a reddish tail area. Males are plain in comparison and usually have a pale brown or greyish tint to them. With other species the males are usually more brightly colored than the females are, but with the Samurai Gourami, the opposite is true. This is known as sexual dimorphism.

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Celestial Pearl Danio: Care, Tank Size, Breeding & More

Celestial Pearl Danios (Danio Margaritatus) are a newly discovered species of freshwater fish, and there is much to learn about this fish. They are admired by aquarium hobbyists all over the world for their vibrant color, and active nature. They are often referred to as Galaxy Rasboras, or Firework Rasboras. However, these little fish are more closely related to Danios than they are to Rasboras.

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Nile Perch Care: Tank Setup, Food, Behavior & More

Nile Perch are hearty freshwater fish, but keep in mind when purchasing a tank for larger species of fish, you’re buying for long-term care, and so should plan for the largest community you want. A 90-gallon tank is recommended for keeping a perch, as they are large, active, and can grow to fit their surroundings. A larger starter tank will allow you to keep more fish, as well as keep your maintenance time down. The tank will need a heater to maintain temperatures between 75-77 degrees Fahrenheit. They are native to Africa and prefer warm waters.

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Longnose Hawkfish (Oxycirrhites typus): Ultimate Care Guide

Best suited to a serene setup, the Longnose Hawkfish appreciates plenty of places to perch and look out over its watery territory.
Being Tropical fish, the optimal temperature for Longnose Hawkfish is between 76.8-84.2F. The water temperature should be stable.
Longnose Hawkfish will thrive in a PH of 8.0-8.4. Fluctuations in PH will not be good for your fish.
Longnose Hawkfish are relatively small. They grow to be up to 5 inches (13cm).

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Pink Skunk Clownfish

The pink skunk clownfish is an unusual looking clownfish with a peachy orange colored body and one single white stripe on the head and the cheek. The stripe runs down up to the entire length of the back of the fish. A contradicting stripe is located at behind the eye. These fishes may be pretty aggressive with the smaller fishes nevertheless; they may be browbeaten by many energetic fellow fishes in the tank.

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